Day 113

We got started an hour late today.  The kids, although relatively good-natured, moved slower than molasses in wintertime. So, I spent the entire day in the classroom and the entire evening helping S and H (the four-year-old) clean the den of chaos that is their bedroom. Whew!

N (age 11):

  • Math: After some mental math and a 30-problem worksheet on fraction simplification, N learned how to compare fractions by converting them to decimals.  Comparing decimals has historically been a little tricky for her, but she’s continuing to progress.  She completed her 30-problem lesson review.
  • Spelling: N continued to practice words ending the the “l” sound spelled with “al,” “el,” and “le.”
  • Writing: N began to write a descriptive paper on our house by writing the introduction.
  • Reading: N read two chapters of I am Malala, because she thought one chapter wasn’t quite long enough.
  • Science: N and C wrote definitions and their Greek/Latin derivatives of words pertaining to types of storms.
  • History: N and C learned about the Phoenicians in ancient Canaan.  They mapped the many Phoenician colonies around the Mediterranean.  N did supplemental reading and note-taking on the Phoenicians.
  • Spanish: N practiced all the vocabulary she’s learned so far.  Then, she read and translated a short story, and answered comprehension questions.
  • Music: N continued to work on the difficult lesson piece she’s been assigned this week.

C (age 9):

  • Math: C reviewed the 9 and 12 times tables, and she recited the perfect squares to 100. Then, she tackled more division.  This lesson was about dividing a two-digit number by a one-digit number when the quotient was two digits. We used money to illustrated the concept.  She understands, but she definitely needs more practice to reinforce it.  She completed a lesson review worksheet.
  • Writing: C and I read a work of fiction in two ways: one telling what the characters are thinking and feeling, and one not telling what the characters are thinking and feeling.  We discussed how a fiction story is improved when one knows what the characters are thinking and feeling.
  • Reading: C read a chapter of Moby Dick.
  • Science: Combined class.
  • History: Combined class, but C didn’t do the supplemental reading.
  • Music: The usual.

S (age 6):

  • Math: S practiced her number recognition through 11.  She still struggles with 6 and 8.  The optometrist says that’s common for kids who wear glasses.  Strange, but okay.
  • Reading: I found some fantastic and free worksheets to help reinforce beginning sounds!  The Measured Mom has free printables for each letter of the alphabet with pictures.  The student colors in the pictures that have the same beginning sound as the letter portrayed.  So, I had S review A and B using these worksheets. She and I sang the alphabet song to begin the next lesson.  I introduced the letter C and S pointed it out on the alphabet chart.  Then, I read a short poem about cats getting caught eating cream.  S and H took turns pointing out all the Cs in the poem. S colored in a picture of the letter C with some cats and cream. Next, S and I played another rhyming game.   I put three cards in front of her.  Two of the cards had rhyming pictures, and one did not.  She had to match the rhyming words and give me the non-rhyming word.
  • Writing: S copied the letter C multiple times on a worksheet.
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Homeschool Daily

I was an education major in college, but I hated teaching. And then I started homeschooling. Good days, bad days, I love them all! It's a great adventure with my favorite people in the whole world.

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