Day 108

Thankfully, the snow didn’t start falling today until after we finished school, so attention spans were a bit better. Even snow just lying on the ground is enough to drive my Southern children to distraction, but they actually did quite well and got their work done quickly. As is usual, Wednesdays are mostly independent work days.

N (age 11):

  • Math: N learned a couple new tricks for her mental math repertoire.  She completed a 3o-problem sheet simplifying fractions.  Then, she learned to use exponents more extensively and did some work converting decimal numbers to fractions and mixed numbers.  The snow began falling before she started her 30-problem lesson review, so she’ll either do that tonight or have extra independent math work tomorrow.
  • Spelling: N continued to practice her words containing “gn,” “kn,” “rr,” and “wr.”
  • Writing: N sketched the floorplans of both stories of our house.
  • Reading: N was surprised how short her chapter of Nothing’s Fair in Fifth Grade was today after how long they’ve been recently.
  • Science: N and C copied definitions related to precipitation, along with the Greek and Latin derivatives. They continued to record the daily high and low temperatures, relative humidity, barometric pressure, and atmospheric conditions.
  • History: N and C learned about the Middle Kingdom of Egypt, the Nubians, and the Hyksos from Canaan.  They found the regions of Egypt, Nubia, and Canaan on their maps.  N did additional reading on life in Egypt during the time of the Middle Kingdom.
  • Music: The usual daily routine.

C (age 9):

  • Math: After working on the 4, 5, 6, and 9 times tables, C learned how to divide by 3, 6, and 9.  She’s still a little iffy on the concept of division, so I’m keeping an eye on her work to see if we need to step back and review.  The spiral teaching method of Saxon may be enough rote to firmly entrench the concept without the need for further review.  We’ll see.  She completed a 30-problem division sheet and a lesson review worksheet.
  • Spelling: C completed an assessment with flying colors.
  • Writing: C continued writing an introduction about her friend by describing the way her friend talks and some of her friend’s catchphrases.
  • Reading: C continued reading Moby Dick (abridged).
  • Science: Combined class, so see N.
  • History: Combined class.  C did everything N did with the exception of the supplemental reading.
  • Typing: C continued building her speed and accuracy.
  • Music: The usual daily routine.

S (age 6):

  • Reading: After my mild breakdown yesterday, I spent a lot of the night researching the Orton-Gillingham method and homeschool curriculum options for struggling and/or dyslexic readers.  I finally settled on All About Reading, the pre-reader kit. While I’m waiting for that to arrive, I’m going to work with her on some phonemic awareness.  So, throughout the course of our day, I pointed out all the words she used that had the short-vowel “a” sound in them.  Tomorrow, I’m going to start including words she uses that contain the short “e” sound.
  • Math: S enjoys math, but I thought we needed a break today from the “traditional” approach I prefer.  S used her math skills to bake some scones with me.  She didn’t even realize she had school today.
  • Writing: S is working on her Valentines, so writing class is dedicated to drawing shapes.

One of the things I love about homeschooling is being able to adjust my approach to fit each child’s specific learning style.  It’s one of the challenges, too, however.  I’m finding that I have to really keep up to date with different teaching methods and learning styles: left-brained, right-brained, probable dyslexic … I love a good challenge!

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Homeschool Daily

I was an education major in college, but I hated teaching. And then I started homeschooling. Good days, bad days, I love them all! It's a great adventure with my favorite people in the whole world.

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